Posts filed under the 'posterous' category


Counting knuckles for the days in each month

Just to show you that algorithms can come from the most bizarre places... At lunchtime I was flipping through the Oxford Dictionary of Nursery Rhymes (don't ask), when I came across the nursery rhyme -- or, more accurately, the mnemonic -- that describes the numbers of days in each month: Thirty days hath September, April, June, and November; All the rest have thirty-one, Excepting February alone, And that has twenty-eight days clear And twenty-nine in each leap year. I learned this one when...

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Testing Writerous

Scott Lovegrove ( @scottisafool on Twitter) is a Windows Live Writer fan and he's been working on a plug-in for it called Writerous that will publish a blog post to Posterous . He's got it ready for beta, and since I also am a Live Writer fan and have a blog on Posterous, I begged him for a spot on his beta team. Several used fivers changed hands, and I'm in. Since Posterous requires you to email a post to get it published, I'm interested to see how Writerous gets around it. This is my first post...

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Entrenched developers

Something I've been pondering on given a couple of articles I read recently: I find I dislike (and have done for a while) developers who get entrenched in what they know and thereby deem everything else as being wrong. It's the worst kind of rut. They become immune to new ideas, new developments, new methodologies. The first article was a paper published in the Communications of the ACM called A Few Billion Lines of Code Later: Using Static Analysis to Find Bugs in the Real World by Bessey et al...

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How to survive on three passwords

Some time ago, I read in some issue of Women's Health , a magazine my wife subscribes to, that you can survive in the modern always-connected online world on just three passwords. One password for your financial institutions, one password for the less important sites (say, your social sites, or your shopping sites), and one password for everything which you don't consider important or particularly care about or is essence a one off. Bloody nonsense, was how I put it to myself at the time...

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How identifiable are you on the net?

I'm sure we're all aware that the browser we use (the User Agent in internet-speak) reports back information to each web server we visit. But could a web server gain any information about who we are just from the browser? Could we be identified when we visit later on? You might think: easy, just turn off cookies and we'd be pretty much unidentifiable, but is that the case? I tried out a web site called Panopticlick put up by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) to see how identifiable...

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Windows 7 Home Premium: turn off password expiration

I use Windows 7 Home Premium as the OS in the various virtual machines I run. This is a space saving thing more than anything: I've limited the boot drive space to 20GB on my base VM so that I can have as many cloned VMs as I want on my external drive, and I'm assuming that Ultimate takes up a lot more room. Anyway... The base install of Win7 Home Premium sets passwords to expire after 42 days. For a VM this is somewhat overkill (after all, I have to log in to my real machine in order to...

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Firefox 3.6 and S3Fox

A quick warning for those who use the S3 Firefox Organizer in Firefox on Windows and are contemplating upgrading to the new Firefox 3.6 : S3Fox does not yet work in Firefox 3.6 and is automatically disabled when you upgrade. UPDATE : S3Fox has now been updated (v 0.4.9) to support Firefix 3.6 (8-Feb-2010). I got bitten by this issue with my last blog post since I'd updated my main machine with Firefox 3.6 on the day of release. Luckily I hadn't upgraded my laptop and so was able to use that one's...

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Megapixel Madness

Found this site this morning: Petavoxel , a brand new blog that so far seems to talk mostly about the hardware aspects of photography, especially about why the rush for more megapixels in a point-and-shoot camera is an exercise in stupidity. The most interesting from a visual aspect is this article : it shows a crop (not magnified or otherwise distorted) from a photo taken by an ordinary point-and-shoot (I so want to abbreviate that to POS -- Must. Stop.). The artifacts from the ultra-tiny pixels...

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Understanding the Apple Kool-Aid

This past weekend, the touchscreen part of my iPhone 3GS became what I can only describe as insensitive: it would hardly register any gestures or flicks up or down, and taps to the upper part of the screen wouldn't register. I felt completely stupid tapping forcefully on the screen: it's not as if there's anything mechanical going on that would respond better to such vigorous actions. There was even a point when I couldn't flick the slider to power off the phone: it's at the top of the screen. Needless...

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Handbrake 0.9.4 slower?

I use Handbrake and AnyDVD to rip DVDs I buy to iPhone/iPod Touch format so that I can watch them on flights. Since I fly quite often (to the DevExpress offices in Glendale, various conferences, home in England, etc), watching what I want to watch during these boring flights has been a life-saver, or at least a sanity saver. I recently updated to the latest Handbrake, version 0.9.4. Nicer GUI, more intuitive selection of options, a zillion fixes, seemed like a winner. Just now I started to rip the...

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